doing things the victorian way

Tag Archives: bagel

bagels
 
Bagels
  • 240 ml water, room temperature
  • 3 g dry active yeast
  • .5 oz honey
  • .5 oz caster sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 17 oz bread flour, 1.5 oz reserved

1) In a mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in water. Add honey, sugar & salt, mixing briefly. Add bread flour, reserving 1.5 oz, until thoroughly combined. Add remaining flour only if sticky.

2) Knead dough briefly to insure ingredients are combined, 1 to 2 minutes. This particular dough needs little, if any, kneading. Dough will be firm to the point of slightly “tough,” non-sticky but not smooth as with doughs that are kneaded.

3) Place dough in bowl (do not grease), cover with cling film and set in refrigerator to rise for 7 to 12 hours (overnight). Allowing the dough to rise very slowly in a cold environment makes for a “chewy” dough, perfect for bagels.

4) Remove dough from fridge and let come to room temperature. Punch down and let rise in a warm spot, until dough doubles in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

5) Deflate dough and divide into six to eight pieces, depending on desired size. Between your palms, roll dough back and forth to form a rope. Length of rope is dependent on size of bagel you wish to achieve, though I usually roll mine out to five inches. If you have trouble rolling the dough out to achieve desired length, roll as much as possible and then let dough rest for ten minutes to let the gluten relax before trying again.

6) To form, overlap the ends of the ropes about 1/2 inch and rock the dough back and forth between your palms to seal. Try to achieve uniform thickness throughout your ring. The rings do not have to be perfect, just close to it, otherwise they won’t bake uniformly.

7) Set rings aside on floured surface to rise until slightly less than doubled in size.

Boiling Liquid
  • 1 to 1 1/2 gallon water
  • 1 potato, peeled and cut into quarters

8) While dough rises for the last time, in a large pot on high heat, combine water and potato. Bring to a boil and allow to boil until potato becomes soft and water becomes slightly cloudy, 15 to 20 minutes. Strain, reserving water & discarding potato.

9) Preheat oven to 450°F.

9) When dough has sufficiently risen, bring potato water back to a boil. Once boiling, gently drop rings into water two to three at a time. Boiling is what creates the chewy, crisp crust on the bagel. The longer the dough is boiled, the chewier the crust. Boil one side of bagel for 1 to 1 1/2 minutes depending on desired crust. Carefully flip the bagel over in the water and boil other side.

10) With slotted spoon, carefully remove boiled dough and transfer to baking sheet (not greased). Dough will be puffed and slightly shiny.

11) Baked for 10 to 12 minutes, until dough begins to brown. Flip bagels over and bake for another 10 to 12 minutes, until bagels are a medium to dark brown and shiny. Carefully remove from oven and allow to cool on wire rack.

12) Enjoy!

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